The Magnificat

‘My soul proclaims the greatness of the Lord
and my spirit exults in God my saviour;
because he has looked upon his lowly handmaid.
Yes, from this day forward all generations will call me blessed,
for the Almighty has done great things for me.
Holy is his name,
and his mercy reaches from age to age for those who fear him.
He has shown the power of his arm,
he has routed the proud of heart.
He has pulled down princes from their thrones and exalted the lowly.
The hungry he has filled with good things, the rich sent empty away.
He has come to the help of Israel his servant, mindful of his mercy
– according to the promise he made to our ancestors –
of his mercy to Abraham and to his descendants for ever.’

Saint Martha and Saint Lazarus

As Jesus and his disciples were on their way, he came to a village where a woman named Martha opened her home to him. She had a sister called Mary, who sat at the Lord’s feet listening to what he said. But Martha was distracted by all the preparations that had to be made. She came to him and asked, “Lord, do you not care that my sister has left me to do the work by myself? Tell her to help me!”

“Martha, Martha,” the Lord answered, “you are worried and upset about many things, but only one thing is needed. Mary has chosen what is better, and it will not be taken away from her.”

(Luke 10:38-42)

 

When Martha heard that Jesus was coming, she went out to meet him, but Mary stayed at home. “Lord”, Martha said to Jesus, “if you had been here, my brother would not have died. But I know that even now God will give you whatever you ask.”

Jesus said to her, “Your brother will rise again.”
Martha answered, “I know he will rise again in the resurrection at the last day.”
Jesus said to her, “I am the resurrection and the life. He who believes in me will live, even though he dies; and whoever lives and believes in me will never die. Do you believe this?”
“Yes, Lord”, she told him, “I believe that you are the Christ, the Son of God, who was to come into the world.”

(John 11:20-27)

 

Jesus loved Martha, and her sister Mary, and Lazarus.

(John 11:5)

The Catholic Table

I have just finished reading a book called The Catholic Table, by Emily Stimpson Chapman. It discusses food and eating from a Catholic perspective, with plenty of scriptural references and quotes from the saints, as well as lovely recipes at the end of each chapter.

If you have ever had issues with food – eating too much, too little, or even both – I would highly recommend it. Recognising food as a gift from God, an opportunity to practise virtue, a way to bond with others, and, ultimately, as the means through which God gives Himself to us, helps us to enjoy it without abusing it, even if this improvement is a slow process.

Emily also has a blog of the same name, which you can find here. It contains many more recipes, hosting tips and articles on food in the context of the spiritual life.

It’s comfortable to read (even for slow readers like me) and written with humour. Why not give it a go? 🙂